2019 NHWWC Agenda

nhwwc_logo_cropNew Hampshire Water & Watershed Conference – March 15, 2019 at Plymouth State University

Note: The agenda below is subject to change. We are working on a few final details so there will be some additional edits and the order of talks may change. 

8:00 am – 8:45 am: Registration and networking – Merrill Place Lobby

8:45 am – 9:45 am: Plenary Session:

The Million-Dollar Question: How are New Hampshire’s lakes and rivers doing? David Neils, Chief Aquatic Biologist for NHDES

For years, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) has collected data from our surface waters. Various reports summarize these data for individual waterbodies and the biennial water quality assessment serves as the primary process for determining impairment.  However, until recently, a statewide approach to monitoring and reporting was lacking. Come learn about the state’s new strategy for a coordinated approach to surface water monitoring and an updated assessment of the condition of our waterbodies.

9:45 am – 10:30 am: Poster Session

10:30 am – 12:00 pm: Morning Talks (4 breakout sessions, 3 talks per session)

Economy of Water Chair: Amy Villamagna

GIS and Remote Sensing for Environmental Science and Management Chair: Shane Csiki

Community Conservation Partnerships Chair: Judy Tumosa

Water Quality and Quantity Regulations Chair: Vivien Taylor

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm: Lunch

1:00 pm – 2:30 pm: Afternoon Talks (3 breakout sessions, 3 talks per session)

Fish and Freshwater Fragmentation Chair: Amy Villamagna

Roles & Concerns of Sediments: From Land to Water Chair: Carolyn Greenough

Use of New Technology in Water Resources Chair: Michelle Shattuck

2:30 pm – 2:45 pm:   Break

2:45 pm – 3:45 pm:   Panel Discussion:

Positive Outcomes to Address a Changing Water Landscape: One Step at a Time – Moderator Shane Csiki, NH Geological Survey

In recent years, many towns in New Hampshire have commented that the form of our water resources, whether it be increased river dynamics, or watershed processes, is changing. Addressing these issues in its entirety, at once, is daunting, but towns have taken actions to address new and emerging problems. Our panel of representatives from local communities will share their experiences implementing projects that demonstrate positive steps to address our changing watershed processes. You will have the opportunity to engage with our panel and ask questions on how best to execute successful projects (in addition to the challenges!) so that New Hampshire can continue to accumulate positive changes through successful projects, one step at a time.

Throughout the Day: Posters on New Hampshire Water Topics

  • Temporal trends of physical and chemical parameters measured in tributaries of the Saco/Ossipee Watershed – Jillian Emerson and Victoria Green
  • A Contest-Based Crowdsourcing Scheme to Monitor Household Water Quality – Scott Greenwood
  • Every Drop: A clean water movement of enjoyment & protection – Trevor Mattera
  • The Androscoggin River Watershed Stream Crossing Assessment Project – Ashley Newell
  • WaterViz! A Water Cycle Visualization Tool at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest- Sarah Thorne
  • Twitter/ Social Media Poster- Tom Swenson
  • The Effects of Storm Events on Nitrogen in Small Impoundments- Eliza Balch
  • Groundwater-Dependent Spawning by Brook Trout in the Dead Diamond River and Beyond- Keith Fritschie