Achievements | September 5, 2017

With the start of a new academic year and movement on transitioning to Integrated Clusters, we’ve organized disciplines by cluster below. As this is a work in a progress, please let us know if any of these accomplishments are out of place, psu-academic-affairs@plymouth.edu.

Arts & Technologies

  • English
    • This summer, poems by Liz Ahl were published at The Good Men Project (https://goodmenproject.com/author/liz-ahl/) and Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry, as well as in two anthologies: Double Kiss: Stories, Poems, Essays on the Art of Billiards(Mammoth Books), and Nasty Women Poets: An Unapologetic Anthology of Subversive Verse (Lost Horse Press).
      This past May, Abby Goode presented the paper, “Postbellum Proto-eugenics in Whitman’s Reconstruction Writing” at the American Literature Association Annual Conference in Boston, MA. This presentation discussed how Walt Whitman’s writings developed a eugenic vision of American sustainability and small farm labor. In June, Abby received a fellowship to participate in the First Book Institute at the Center for American Literary Studies at Pennsylvania State Universit At this week-long institute, directed by Sean X. Goudie and Priscilla Wald, eight junior faculty in American literary studies presented sections of their books-in-progress and participated in faculty- and publisher-led workshops. The purpose of the institute is to assist junior faculty in transforming their books into “ones that promise to make the most significant impact possible on the field.” Also in June, Abby participated in the USNH Academic Technology Institute as one of Plymouth State University’s Faculty Ambassadors. As part her role, Abby will draw on the principles of open education and OER in her new 4-credit “Rethinking Early American Literature” course. Specifically, in this course, students will design, curate, and edit their own digital, open-access anthology of Early American Literature. This past July, Abby began the first half of her Kate B. and Hall J. Peterson Visiting Research Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, MA. While there, Abby looked for early population control discourse in nineteenth-century agricultural periodicals–material that she will include in her book about the American literary history of sustainability. Abby will complete this fellowship in January 2018. Lastly, her recently published article, “No ‘Rural Bowl of Milk’: Demographic Agrarianism and Unsustainability in Pierre” appears in the Spring 2017 issue of Studies in American Fiction. The article is available through the PSU library. Click here for a pdf.
    • Karolyn Kinane participated in the Mind and LifeSummer Research Institute held at the Garrison Institute, Garrison, NY From June 5-11, 2017. The Institute accepted 115 participants from thirty-two countries and six continents.  The Institute’s theme, “Intersubjectivity and Social Connectivity,” brought together scientists, clinicians, philosophers, artists, humanists, and legal and economic experts to engage in interdisciplinary research & practice on the nature of human relations.
    • In May, Ann McClellan gave a guest workshop on “Digital Assignments in the Humanities?
      Learning Outcomes and Skill-Based” Assessments” for St. Thomas Aquinas College in New York.
    • In June, she participated in the USNH Academic Technology Instituteas one of Plymouth State University’s Faculty Ambassadors. She will be using an open pedagogy approach in designing assessments in her fall Digitalit class, and she will be working with her Rethinking Modern British Literature students this spring on creating an open educational textbook on British literature 1660-present day. In July, Ann was invited to give the opening night symposium, “The Spectre of Doyle’s Hound: Detecting Sherlock Holmes’s Popularity,” for the Winnipisaukee Players’ production of Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles.
    • Niloufar Talebi has been conceiving, writing, and developing an opera, Abraham in Flames, with composer Aleksandra Vrebalov and director Roy Rallo. Abraham in Flames is a “Bildungsoper,” a story of our spiritual becoming, written for girls chorus, 5 soloists, and musical ensemble. The opera is inspired by Niloufar coming of age in the tumultuous years after the 1979 Iranian revolution around the iconic Iranian poet, Ahmad Shamlou. Other sources of inspiration are paintings of the Garden of Gethsemane, Trials by Fire, and more. To date, the opera has received support from the San Francisco Arts Commission, the California Arts Council, the Wattis Foundation, the Creative Work Fund, the Sam Mazza Foundation, and New Music USA. On May 31, 2017 Niloufar presented a multimedia libretto reading and preview concert of Abraham in Flames at the San Francisco International Arts Festival to packed and mixed audiences. You can read a print interviewwith Niloufar about the opera  or listen to an audio interview with KALW’s Your Call. Lastly, Niloufar Talebi’s translation from the Persian of contemporary Iranian author Farideh Razi’s gritty novel, “Vis & I” (1998 novel of the year in Iran) was published to critical acclaim for the translation. (l’Aleph, 2017).
  • History, Philosophy & Social Studies Ed
    • June 2017 – August 2017: Maria Sanders was invited to host her weekly Philosophy 4 Life Radio show at WUNH-Durham (91.3 FM) during Summer 2017. The show aired on Fridays from 11am to noon from WUNH’s studio located on the University of New Hampshire’s campus. Guests included Liz Ahl (Poetry), Jessica Dutille (Connecting with our Youth), Kyle Burke (Board Game Strategies and Problem-Solving), Cynthia Robinson (Raising Awareness through Art Exhibits), Brandon Haas (Reflections on the Holocaust), Sean Collins (Philosophical Conceptions: Doctoral Program in Physical Therapy), Kathleen Norris (Education Systems in Alaska and Japan), and Elaine Allard (The Transformation of the Traditional Library). Complete audio can be found at philosophy4life.com/philosophy4life-radio.
    • June 2017 to August 2017: Maria Sanders and Jessica Dutille continued cohosting the Happiness Quest TV show through the Summer 2017, filming every other Wednesday morning. The show airs on Pemi Baker Cable TV (Station 20) and offers philosophical reflections on happiness incorporating current research from various disciplines including Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, Economics, and Business. Previous episodes can be viewed on Pemi Baker TV’s youtube station or at www.philosophy4life.com/happiness-quest-tv ..
    • July 5, 2017: Maria Sanders and Cynthia Robinson guided the Ethics and Values Systems’ students from the Doctoral program in Physical Therapy through several sites participating in Walkabout Wednesdays. Students reflected upon a holistic view of health and wellness, presented posters they created articulating the relevancy of the Happiness Quest Cluster Project and the Walkabout Wednesdays event to their discipline of Physical Therapy.
    • July 17 to July 24, 2017: Maria Sanders was awarded a Writers in Residency at Wildacres Retreat in Little Switzerland, North Carolina to begin writing a book on the Philosophy 4 Life Radio Program.
    • July 25, 2017: Maria Sanders presented “The Quest for Happiness” talk at Goffstown Public Library who had received a Humanities to Go Grant from New Hampshire Humanities. This talk explores the Science of Happiness and how it applies to living full and flourishing lives.
    • August 06, 2017: Maria Sanders delivered a talk entitled “Social and Ethical Considerations of Smart Home Technologies” at the New Hampshire World Fellowship Center which explored philosophical reflections on data collection and social interaction arising from the incorporation of technology into everyday life environments.
    • August 27, 2017: Maria Sanders presented “The Quest for Happiness” talk at Deering Community Church who had received a Humanities to Go Grant from New Hampshire Humanities. This talk explores the Science of Happiness and how it applies to living full and flourishing lives.

 

Education, Democracy & Social Change

  • Early Childhood Education
    • The Center for Young Children and Families (CYCF) has earned accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)—the world’s largest organization working on behalf of young children. To earn NAEYC Accreditation, the CYCF went through an extensive self-study and quality-improvement process, followed by an on-site visit by NAEYC Assessors to verify and ensure that the program meets rigorous research-based standards associated with high-quality early care and education. NAEYC Accreditation is a widely-recognized sign of high-quality early childhood education. More than 7,000 programs are currently accredited by NAEYC—less than 10 percent of all child care centers, preschools, and kindergartens nationally achieve this recognition. The CYCF has provided high quality child care and education for the community since 1979. This marks the 20th year of continuous accreditation.
    • In July, Elisabeth Johnston presented with a colleague at the Conference for the Advancement of Mathematics Teaching in Fort Worth, TX. These sessions, Work smarter, not harder! Integrating math across the curriculum, engaged math teachers (PK-2 or 3-5) to consider how to help learners connect mathematics to other content areas such as science, social studies, and art.
    • During August, Elisabeth presented at the summer conference for the Association of Teacher Educators in Pittsburgh, PA. This presentation focused on the preliminary analysis of the qualitative data from a larger project focusing on teachers’ self efficacy in teaching mathematics in early childhood and elementary. Elisabeth and her colleague provided insights to this work during the round table discussion entitled, In-service and pre-service teachers’ thinking about mathematics teaching across the five domains of NCTM.
    • Patricia Cantor has been appointed to the nine-member advisory board for the Children’s Screen Time Action Network (CSTAN), a new initiative from the national advocacy organization Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood. CSTAN will focus on providing resources and critical support for practitioners, educators, and families who are working to reduce screen time and its negative impact on childhood. CSTAN will officially launch in September 2017.
    • Faculty members Mary Cornish, Elisabeth Johnston, and Patricia Cantor, along with Center for Young Children and Families Director Karen Sanders and Teachers Wendy Hartke and Kayla Roper, attended two full days of training in the Pyramid Model on July 31 and August 1. The Pyramid Model for Supporting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children is a conceptual framework of evidence-based practices developed through federally funded research. It builds upon a tiered public health approach to provide universal supports to all children to promote social and emotional development, targeted services to those who need more support, and intensive services for those who need them. The two days of training focused on universal strategies for promoting healthy social and emotional development and preventing challenging behavior and effective strategies for teaching foundational social/emotional skills to children. The state of NH has recently become the 28th Pyramid Model state, with the goal of implementing the Pyramid Model in programs serving children birth through 5. Patricia Cantor represents higher education on the NH State Leadership Team for the Pyramid Model.
  • Elementary Education & Youth Development
    • Susan Shapiro, Elementary Education & Youth Development, attended CAST’s 3rd Annual Summer Symposium: UDL for Social Justice: Using Universal Design for Learning to Educate Underserved Learners, held at the University of Massachusetts, from July 31st through August 2nd.
    • Susan Shapiro, Elementary Education & Youth Development, recorded a two-part podcast for SWIFT Unscripted, titled: Tailoring education: A journey through differentiated instruction and emotional/behavioral instruction.
    • Alison Wenhart, Elementary Education & Youth Development, did a presentation called “The Problem Won’t Solve Itself; Let the Students Do It!” at a conference called, Sowing  Seeds of Democracy. The conference was hosted by New Hampshire Institute for Civics Education in Peterborough, NH on June 26th.
    • Alison Wenhart, Elementary Education & Youth Development, was a member of the New Hampshire Voices Panel Conversation at that conference where the discussion focused on the growing need to integrate civics education into other content areas within the current K-12 curriculum.

 

Exploration & Discovery

  • Atmospheric Science and Chemistry
    • Anil Waghe and Aparna Waghe participated in the “Indo-Global Education Summit & Expo” and the “Indo-Global Skills Summit & Expo” in Mumbai, India on July 17, 2017. These joint events focused on the development of academic collaborations between Indian institutions and foreign universities, student recruitment, skills development, academic and industry collaborations and entrepreneurship. Waghes met with several faculty members from the Indian and foreign institutions as well as the undergraduate and graduate students from colleges in Mumbai. They also met with the director and staff of the office of student recruitment in Mumbai.
    • Anil Waghe and Aparna Waghe were invited speakers at the R. D. National College, Mumbai, India on July 19, 2017. About 50 senior undergraduate chemistry majors and chemistry faculty members attended the talks. Anil Waghe discussed the emerging technologies & research in chemistry and the graduate level studies in chemistry. Aparna Waghe discussed the role of women in science and the careers in chemistry.
    • Anil Waghe and Aparna Waghe participated in the NSF-sponsored workshop on “Medicinal Plants: A Healthy Supplement to the Chemistry Curriculum” at Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, AL from Jul 30-Aug 4, 2017. This hands-on, collaborative workshop provided participants with the perspectives and resources that can be used to incorporate medicinal plants in chemistry curriculum.
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Robin DeRosa co-taught a course on “Critical Praxis for the Digital Humanities” at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria (BC), and co-taught a track on “Open Pedagogy and Social Justice” at Digital Pedagogy Lab Vancouver. She also gave talks on Open Education for faculty at Grinnell College and Austin Community College, and she delivered the keynote address, “Higher Ed, Lower Ed, Open Ed: Pitfalls and Potential in Adult Learning” for the University System of Maine’s summer institute on adult learning. Robin was also featured in an Inside Higher Edarticle about Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Pedagogy, and she contributed a chapter (co-written with Rajiv Jhangiani) on Open Pedagogy to a new guide to making OER with students, published by Rebus Community. Janina Misiewicz, the IDS Program Support Administrator, spent two months of her summer in Mexico, studying and interning at a language school called the Na’atik Institute.

 

Health & Human Enrichment

  • Health & Human Performance
    • Michael Brian co-authored and published the following articles:
      • Matthews, E. L., Brian, M. S., Edwards, D. G., Stocker, S. D., Wenner, M. M., & Farquhar, W. B. (2017). Blood pressure responses to dietary sodium: Association with autonomic cardiovascular function in normotensive adults. Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical.
      • Muth, B. J., Brian, M. S., Chirinos, J. A., Lennon, S. L., Farquhar, W. B., & Edwards, D. G. (2017). Central systolic blood pressure and aortic stiffness response to dietary sodium in young and middle-aged adults. Journal of the American Society of Hypertension.
    • Exercise and Sport Physiology student, Felicia Berube, presented at the regional NH-INBRE conference on August 15th. She presented the following research abstract titled: “The effect of volume loading on cardiovascular responses at rest and during exercise between men and women.” (Research Mentor: Michael Brian)
  • Physical Therapy (DPT)
    • Cheryl Coker and Sean Collins co-authored two presentations which were delivered at the annual meeting of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity entitled “Association of Functional Movement Screen performance with perceived and actual motor skill competence in middle school physical education students and Relationship between body mass index and functional movement, perceived physical competence and motor skill proficiency in middle school students.”
    • The 4thedition of the textbook Motor Learning and Control for Practitioners by Cheryl Coker will be released mid-September.

 

Innovation & Entrepreneurship

  • Business Administration
    • Welcomed seven new faculty this fall which include:
      • Denise Hutchins: Teaching Faculty in Organizational Communication & Marketing
      • Raymond England: Teaching Faculty in Management
      • Scott Mantie: Assistant Professor of Marketing
      • Howard Frederick: Senior Teaching Faculty in Entrepreneurship
      • Jonathan Dapra: Assistant Professor of Management
      • George Pettinico: Assistant Professor of Marketing
      • Botao An: Assistant Professor of Finance
    • Congratulations to Deborah Brownstein for her promotion to full Professor of Marketing and Christina Bradbury for her promotion to Associate Professor of Finance
    • Congratulations also to Kylie Hershey, one of two PSU students chosen as a finalist for the 8thannual Rising Star Award. Four finalists were chosen statewide. “The Rising Stars Awards are an initiative of Stay Work Play, in partnership with New Hampshire Public Radio, to celebrate and recognize New Hampshire’s remarkable young workers, entrepreneurs, and college students…”
    • Christina Bradbury’s scholarly work exploring the influence of medical practice size on patient health access was cited in the article “To Reform Medicaid, Congress Must Understand Its Achilles’ Heel” on July 14, 2017 found within the Daily Callerhttp://dailycaller.com/2017/07/14/to-reform-medicaid-congress-must-understand-its-achilles-heel/
    • Bradbury successfully completed the CFP designated Investment Planning course with the College of Financial Planning in July 2017 and is now pursuing specialization in Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits.  In November 2016, she completed a course in the Financial Planning Process and Insurance.
    • In July 2017, Chantalle Forgues published a column entitled, “Supreme Court At-a-Glance” in the New Hampshire Bar News reviewing recent decisions of the New Hampshire Supreme Court.
  • Social Work
    • Annemarie Conlon, Assist. Prof.was engaged in the following over the summer:
      • Attended the 2017 ConnectivitySummit: A Catalyst for Change in Rural Aging, Portsmouth, NH.
      • Updated book chapter,  Kovacs, P., & Conlon, A. (2018).  Very Late Adulthood. In E. D. Hutchison (Ed.), Essentials of Human Behavior. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
      • Reviewed and scored abstracts on the topics of aging and diversity, for The Association of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors 2018 Annual Conference.
    • Kristina Lind, Assoc. Prof.was engaged in the following over the summer:
      • Took 9 SW students to the Internat’l Assoc. of Social Work with Groups Symposium. Kristina presented on “Team-Based Learning: A Means of Teaching Group Work Skills”. Four students, Elena Pensa, Bonnie Krasuski, Brooke Sweet, and Katie Mackle presented a poster titled, “International Students: University Social Clubs as a Means of Safety and Belonging in an Era of Immigration Reform”.
      • Participated in a 5 day “Peace Child” Cluster Project with Trish Lindberg and Cindy Waltman.
      • Elected to the Nominations Committee for NH NASW.

 

Justice & Security

  • Criminal Justice
    • David Mackey and Kristine Levan (University of Idaho) presented two papers “Happy enough to stay: Factors related to college student retention” and “Criminal justice ethics companion reader: Using post-apocalyptic dystopian fiction” at the meeting of the Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences in June. David was also elected 2nd Vice President of the Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences.

 

Tourism, Environment & Sustainable Development

  • Social Science
    • David Starbuck (Anthropology) directed archaeological excavations at Enfield Shaker Village for 4 weeks at the beginning of the summer and then for 6 weeks on Rogers Island, a French & Indian War site on the Hudson River in New York.  Several PSU students participated on each project, and the Rogers Island work was the subject of a lengthy article in The New York Times (August 18, page A20).
    • David also presented lectures to the American Revolution Round Table on “18th Century Military Archaeology in the Upper Hudson and Champlain Valleys” (August 24 in Schuylerville, NY), and to the Queensbury Masonic Historical Society on “Archaeology on Rogers Island: Birthplace of the U.S. Army Rangers” (August 27 in Queensbury, NY).

 

Center for Business and Community Partnerships

  • If you’re looking for projects, class engagement, or other connections to external partners, the CBCP has many opportunities for student and faculty engagement – the complete list was sent via email to all faculty on August 31 and will be available on the CBCP’s web page.
  • A team consisting of the CBCP (Ben Amsden), Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (Andrew Ines), the Enterprise Center (Eric Spieth) and the Center for The Environment (Joe Boyer) have created a set of partnership development materials including an updated MOU template, a revised conflict of interest policy, and a revised IP disclosure process. These materials will be accessed through a new “Engagement” tab on the PSU website, which will be going live in the next week or so. Thanks to Emily Evans for helping construct this site. Ben and Andrew will be happy to help anyone who wishes to use or learn more about these new materials.
  • The High Impact Learning Team (Jess Dutille and Casey Krafton) completed an update of the online High Impact Learning Training Modules that prepare students for off-campus engagement. These materials will be located on the Center for Transformation’s website.
  • Rachelle Lyons played a key role in helping the North Country Resource Conservation and Development group receive of a USDA grant to support a market development project for New Hampshire farmers. We are looking for G/UG student and faculty participation, please see Rachelle to learn more.
  • Jess Dutille and Casey Krafton hosted the Annual PSU Partner Brunch, a training and networking session for over a dozen external partners and faculty who are involved in off-campus student engagement.
  • Jess Morel conducted a site visit to Homeland Security and Emergency Management to develop an internship-to-career pipeline program. Jess also hosted Northwestern Mutual Insurance to develop a college representative program (intern alum) and recruiting schedule. Jess has also played an active role in the developing economic development programming involving Freudenberg and the town of Bristol.
  • Jess Morel (with Erik Pavesic) attended the annual NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) meetings in Nevada.
  • Ben Amsden was invited to participate in UNH Cooperative Extension’s First Impressions Community Assessment Program held in Gorham.
  • Rachelle Lyons coordinated a group of four recent PSU alumni who volunteered to assist New Hampshire Fish and Game with three days of fisheries research in the Second College Grant.
  • Jess Dutille, Casey Krafton, and Jess Morel hosted a faculty workshop on Best Practices for High Impact Learning during University Days.
  • Jess Morel joined the Central NH Chamber of Commerce as a Board Member and PSU liaison.
  • Ben Amsden was elected Vice-Chair of the NH Commission on Rural Affairs. The purpose of the Commission is to study and make recommendations relating to public policy that specifically affects rural areas and rural people.
  • Jess Morel participated in 10 webinars/trainings conducted by Right Management on topics such as Coaching Essentials, Personal Branding, Networking, LinkedIn and Resumes. Jess also attended CIS Abroad Advisory Board and Training in July for International Internships and the PSU School of Record Partnership.
  • Ben Amsden attended the NH Business Day Luncheon and Workshop hosted by the Business and Industry Association and Senator Shaheen in Washington, DC.
  • Rachelle continued her service as a First Year Fellow and has developed a section of FYS called “Food, Food, Everywhere, and Not a Bite to Eat: Hunger and Food Waste.” This course is part of a larger cluster project (developed with Casey Krafton) that focuses on understanding hunger on PSU’s campus.
  • Casey Krafton joined the Student Support Foundation as a staff advisor.
  • Jess Morel is pleased to welcome the Interdisciplinary Studies and Communication Studies departments to the list of those offering their internship programs through the CBCP.
  • The Community Education Program offered a series of classes and camps that were attended by over 125 community members. Special thanks to Rachelle Lyons, Nina Domina, and all the participating faculty, instructors, and staff who made the following possible:
    • Classes
      • Fun and Inspiration with Watercolor, Screen Printing Intensive, Advanced Study of Thrown and/or Hand-Built Ceramic Form, Painting & Printmaking with Water-based Media, Feierabend: Conversational SolfegeTM, Learn to Swim, Making Friends with Fractions, and Four Arithmetic Operations with and without Traditional Algorithms
    • Summer Camps
      • Theatrical Combat, Theatrical Combat Adult, Jr. LEGO Camp, LEGO Engineering Camp, Mindstorm, and Mindflight
    • Ben Amsden was a member of two summer working groups: The Gen Ed Outcomes Task Force and the Partnership Assessment group.
    • As part of Panther Days, Casey Krafton organized a “Day of Service” for incoming students. Thirty-five new students spent the day working at the Pemi Youth Center, Livermore Falls, D’Acres, and the Habitat for Humanity ReStore. Also, Jess Dutille and Casey held a High Impact Learning orientation session for new students as well as a HIL Open House in the Center for Transformation.
    • Ben Amsden and Jess Dutille participated in the Collaborative Leadership Institute, a three-day workshop for faculty and staff that focused on developing and leading productive meetings, classes, and events.
    • Ben Amsden attended several regional meetings including the North Country Council’s Trail Development stakeholder workshop, the Alternative Transit Working Group led by NH Parks and the USFS, and the summer planning meeting of the Food Solutions New England network team.

 

Center for the Environment

  • Jay Cordeira (ASC) gave two invited seminars at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec Canada and at the University at Albany in Albany, NY in April on the “Emergence of Atmospheric Rivers in Global Hydrometeorology”
  • Jay Cordeira gave an invited lecture at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York in April on “Forecasting Atmospheric Rivers and their Impacts along the U.S. West Coast”.
  • Jay Cordeira presented at the Fourth Annual Lake Mendocino Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations Workshop in La, Jolla California in August on “Developing and Verification of the AR Landfall Tool for Winter 2016-17”.
  • Jay Cordeira and Eric Kelsey (ASC/MWO) attended the New Hampshire Heat Summit in Concord, NH in May that was hosted by CFE affiliate, Kathleen Bush at the NH DHHS.
  • Jay Cordeira received a grant for $24,998 to study the “Science, Observations, and Forecast Tools for the California Atmospheric River Program” in collaboration with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego sponsored by the California Department of Water Resources during July 2017-September 2018.
  • June Hammond Rowan (CFE/ESP) was awarded a research grant for $36,633 from the US Geological Survey and University of NH’s Water Resources Research Center for a project on “Stormwater and Devleopment: How do New Hampshire’s communities address the impacts in the land use planning process?” Two graduate students in Environmental Science and Policy will be working with June on the project this year.
  • CFE & June Hammond Rowan hosted a meeting on “Regional Low Grad Timber Markets” for our partner, the White Mountain National Forest on July 25. This meeting brought over 40 forest industry representatives and congressional delegates to campus to discuss timber markets and the health and productivity of the Northern Forest.
  • CFE sponsored the Franconia Ridge Work Group meeting at PSU on Aug 2. Approximately 30 people from a variety of agencies and organizations came to campus to discuss carrying capacity and management issues related to recreational uses on Franconia Ridge.
  • Joe Boyer (CFE/ESP) attended the SeaGrant Policy Advisory Committee meeting on June 1 at the SeaCoast Science Center in Rye, NH.
  • Joe Boyer participated at June 7th Plymouth Elementary School STEM Academic Fair, judging projects from 6th and 7th grades.
  • Joe Boyer participated in the E&D Cluster Leadership over the summer.
  • Joe Boyer attended the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest collaborators meeting July 11.
  • Joe Boyer attended the Annual Squam Lakes Association meeting as Board member and PSU liason on Aug. 5th.
  • June Hammond Rowan attended a ceremony on Sept. 1 for the swearing in of Tony Tooke as Chief of the US Forest Service by the US Secretary of Agriculture.
  • Student Research & Service (*graduate student, ** undergraduate student)
    • Jay Cordeira advised three ASC student presentations at last semester’s Student Showcase of Excellence:
      • Christopher Hohman**, Julia Moreland**, and Andrea LaRocca.** “OpenSnow: Daily New England Ski Weather Reports by Plymouth State University Meteorology Students”
      • Brandon Mitchell.** “A different perspective on the 2016 Louisiana Flood”, and by
      • Morgan Simms.** “Cold-Air Damming WRF Simulations”
    • Jay Cordeira and his meteorology colleagues worked with 5 undergraduate students during the summer on two different projects funded by external grants during June and July. These students presented their research at the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine in late June and at a fourth annual undergraduate research colloquium in July with students visiting from Lyndon State College (VT) and Hobart and William Smith Colleges (NY).
  • Peer-Reviewed Publications (*graduate student, ** undergraduate student)
    • Young, A. M.*(G16), K. T Skelly*(G16), and J. M. Cordeira, 2017: High-Impact Hydrologic Events and Atmospheric Rivers in California: An Investigation using the NCEI Storm Events Database. Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 3393–3401.
    • Hecht, C. W.*(G16), and J. M. Cordeira, 2017: Characterizing the influence of atmospheric river orientation and intensity on precipitation distributions over North Coastal California, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, doi:10.1002/2017GL074179.
    • Ralph, F. M., Iacobellis, S., P. J. Neiman, J. M. Cordeira, J. R. Spackman, D. Waliser, G. Wick, A. B. White, and C. Fairall, 2017: Dropsonde observations of water vapor transport within North Pacific atmospheric rivers. J. Hydromet, In Press.
    • Bell, J.-L.*(G16), J. N. Boyer; S. J. Crystall, W. F. Nichols, and M. Pruyn. 2017. Floristic quality as an indicator of human disturbance in forested wetlands of northern New England. Ecological Indictors 83:227-231.